?

Log in

No account? Create an account

Previous Entry | Next Entry

I queried, and was informed, that I wouldn't be able to qualify for the Campbell Award in 2007. Because my first qualifying publication appeared in 2001, I do not qualify under rules that will be introduced next year. Also, flipping through the list of contestants this year, some of whom are my friends, great writers all, I realize I'd probably be rather lacking in credits at any rate -- if I were to calculate my first qualifying year as 2001 to the present, I'd be including about three fallow years and only three professional-rate publications (two only appearing later this year). Against people whose credits include novels and pro-publications for the last few solid years? I am ashamed to have entertained this thought.

In other news, Short Skirts, a poem, will be in an upcoming issue of Sitelines. Sitelines is a project of Curtin University's Creative Writing programme, which I graduated from earlier this year. Short Skirts is a poem I did for Advanced Poetry, under my favouritest lecturer in the known universe (and whom I'm supposed to be showing the complete manuscript for Finches to in a week. Ack!) The chosen poem is a bit of an odd selection by me, if only because I thought it was the weakest of the set I sent to Sitelines. Indeed, I ended up having to edit the poem for weird tenses and hanging sentences. Regarding the other two, I was told by the Poetry Editor that I might want to consider adding a glossary for foreign words (only two words in the one poem I know could've evoked this, them being, "Anansi" and "calamansi"), as well as a pronunciation guide. Boggled, I am. But yep, I have a poem appearing soonish in Sitelines.

I've also just discovered that kasturi is a kind of perfume extracted from musk deer. I always thought it was similar to kesatria, which means "knight", and also refers to an Indian caste. All this while, the most common use for kasturi in Malay that I knew was from limau kasturi, or the kaffir lime. Which is a great lime, essential in most forms of Southeast Asian cooking for its leaves, zest and juice. Now that I think about it, I guess it does smell a bit musky.